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William C. Stacey dies at 23; Marine sergeant from Seattle

By Richard Winton, Los Angeles Times

Multi-star generals attended his Arlington National Cemetery funeral. His name adorns a fighter jet. His words echo in the halls of Congress.

Since Marine Sgt. William C. Stacey, age 23, was killed Jan. 31 on a remote hillside inAfghanistan’sHelmand province, a letter he wrote to his family has gained much attention from politicians and the news media.

“It’s quoted by liberals, conservatives and generals and people across the political spectrum. They use it in different ways. But I think Will would be proud of them all,” said Robert Stacey, Will’s father and interim dean at the University of Washington College of Arts and Sciences. Read more…

Fallen Marine’s Letter Read To Troops Overseas

10 News

Sgt. William Stacey’s final words are still being spoken and his message is being heard across the world.

On Jan. 31, Stacey was killed by a roadside bomb in Helmand Province in Afghanistan. He wrote a letter before his fifth and final deployment. Read more…

Memorial Day 2012: Letter From Fallen Marine William Stacey Read Aloud To Troops [FULL TEXT]

By DAVE SMITH:

On Jan. 31, U.S. Marine Sgt. William Stacey was traveling through the Helmand province in the southern part of Afghanistan — his fourth deployment to the country — when suddenly, a homemade bomb exploded,killing the 23-year-old from Redding, Calif. Stacey had been prepared for this kind of tragedy, having already written a letter to his family that would be opened in the event of his death, which explained why he fought.

On Monday, Marine Gen. John Allen, the top U.S. commander and leader of the NATO coalition currently in Afghanistan, read Stacey’s heartrendering letter aloud during a Memorial Day service in Kabul. He read it to honor Stacey’s memory, as well as all of those who died in Afghanistan since the war started back in 2001. Read more…

Memorial Day In Kabul: Marine Sgt. William Stacey’s Letter Marks Memorial Day In Afghan Capital

Gen. John Allen, the top U.S. commander in Afghanistan, observes Memorial Day by reading a letter written by an American soldier to his family before he died earlier this year, at the ISAF headquarters in Kabul, Afghanistan, Monday, May 28, 2012. (AP Photo/Anja Niedringhaus)
By SEBASTIAN ABBOT
The Huffington Post

KABUL, Afghanistan — U.S. Marine Sgt. William Stacey was killed earlier this year by a homemade bomb in southern Afghanistan, a tragedy for which he prepared by writing a letter to his family explaining why he was fighting that was to be read in the event of his death.

The top U.S. commander in Afghanistan, Marine Gen. John Allen, read the 23-year-old’s letter during a Memorial Day service Monday in Kabul in memory of all the troops who have died in the country since the war started in 2001.

“Today we remember his life and his words, for they speak resoundingly and timelessly for our fallen brothers and sisters in arms,” said Allen, who also leads the NATO coalition in Afghanistan. Read more…

Soldier’s words are an inspiration long after his death

by CHRIS DANIELS / KING 5 News

SEATTLE – Bob Stacey, a University of Washington history professor, acknowledges the apple didn’t fall from the tree.

“He had a strong historical sense,” says about his son William, one of 15 soldiers honored at a solemn ceremony near the Wall of Remembrance at Benaroya Hall Monday. “Guys always joked that he was never without a book.”

Marine Sgt. William Stacey died back on January 31st after the military says a homemade bomb exploded during a patrol in South Afghanistan. Bob says shortly after getting the word, his family discovered a “in case of death” letter that William wrote before he left for basic training in early January 2007. Read more…

Fallen Marine’s Letter Marks Memorial Day In Kabul

by THE ASSOCIATED PRESS

KABUL, Afghanistan May 28, 2012, 08:44 am ET

KABUL, Afghanistan (AP) — U.S. Marine Sgt. William Stacey was killed earlier this year by a homemade bomb in southern Afghanistan, a tragedy for which he prepared by writing a letter to his family explaining why he was fighting that was to be read in the event of his death.

The top U.S. commander in Afghanistan, Marine Gen. John Allen, read the 23-year-old’s letter during a Memorial Day service Monday in Kabul in memory of all the troops who have died in the country since the war started in 2001.

“Today we remember his life and his words, for they speak resoundingly and timelessly for our fallen brothers and sisters in arms,” said Allen, who also leads the NATO coalition in Afghanistan.

Read more…

Fallen Pendleton Marines honored, remembered

By ERIKA I. RITCHIE / THE ORANGE COUNTY REGISTER
Marines place the helmets on the rifles at the memorials of five Marines from the Second Battalion, 4th Marines who were killed in Afghanistan, during a remembrance ceremony held Thursday morning on Camp Pendleton.
 

CAMP PENDLETON – Five battlefield crosses with photos of fallen warriors stood in front of two formations of Marines on a parade deck at Camp Pendleton.

The crosses – M-16 rifles adorned with the Marines’ combat boots, helmet and dog tags around them represented Marines and sailors from the 2nd Battalion, 4th Marines who died in Afghanistan.

The battlefield crosses were part of a remembrance ceremony Thursday that paid tribute to the fallen Marines, the families and friends. The event included formations of the 500 Marines from the 2nd Battalion, 4th Marines. The invocation was given by Lieutenant Commander Carl J. Stamper of the Navy. Taps and final Roll Call noting the missing Marines by calling their names and noting their absence with a single bell ended the nearly two-hour ceremony. Read more…

In Section 60, a silent search for meaning

By Dana Milbank


On a flawless spring morning, President Obama stood in the Rose Garden to urge against a hasty retreat from Afghanistan.

“We have a strategy that will allow us to responsibly wind down this war,” he said Tuesday, resisting the calls for a quick exit that were prompted by the slaying of Afghan civilians by a rogue U.S. soldier on Sunday. “Already we’re scheduled to remove 23,000 troops by the end of this summer, following the 10,000 that we withdrew last year.”

A few minutes after Obama spoke those words, I crossed the Potomac to visit with some of those who have already come home, under circumstances nobody wanted. After a decade of wars, more than 800 of them now rest in Arlington National Cemetery. Read more…

Memorial held for Seattle marine

SEATTLEPI.COM STAFF

A memorial service was held Saturday at the University of Washington for a 23-year-old Marine who was killed Jan. 31 in Afghanistan.

Sgt. William C. Stacey grew up in Seattle. His parents, Robert and Robin Stacey, are history professors at the university.

The Defense Department said Stacey was killed by a homemade bomb while on foot patrol. He was on his fourth deployment to Afghanistan.

Stacey was assigned to a unit from Camp Pendleton, Calif., and listed his hometown as Seattle, WA.

Read more…

Marines memorialize Seattle hero

Story by Staff Sgt. Robert Storm

A memorial is held in memory of Sgt. William C. Stacey, a Marine from Seattle, Wash., who was killed in combat in Now Zad District, Helmand Province, Afghanistan on January 31, 2012. Stacey served proudly with the “Magnificent Bastards” of 2nd Battalion, 4th Marines, 6th Marine Regiment. In a letter to his family, he wrote, “If my life buys the safety of a child who will one day change the world, then I know it was all worth it.”


FORWARD OPERATING BASE NOW ZAD, Helmand province, Afghanistan – The Marines stand at attention. War-toughened sergeants shout out “here” as their name is called. Leading the formation, 1stSgt Andrew Golding, 45, weapons company first sergeant, from Fort Lauderdale, Fl. calls the roll.

“Sgt. Stacey.” Silence follows. Read more…